Nine past performers

Past Concerts

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"Bound for Glory" (Woody Guthrie tribute)

Saturday, Sept. 17, 2011, 2:30pm
This was rescheduled from the original date due to inclement weather
Old Manse, 269 Monument Street, Concord, MA

This is a free concert performed outside under a tent, adjacent to the Old Manse in Concord, near North Bridge in Concord, Massachusetts. It will feature a lot of performers from former Woody shows way back to the 60's, along with newer FSSGB members.

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Fall Getaway Weekend

Friday, Sept. 30 through Sunday, Oct. 2, 2011
Prindle Pond Camp and Conference Center
Charlton, Massachusetts

Our staff this year consists of Kate Chadbourne and Tom Smith.

See the Fall Getaway Weekend page for details and a registration form.

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Honey Dewdrops

Honey Dewdrops House concert

Thursday, October, 13, 2011, 8pm
Brookline, MA
$15 at the door
$5 for students (only if reserved in advance)
Reservations required; email suzanne AT smrozak DOT com for
reservations and directions.

The Honey Dewdrops, otherwise known as Laura Wortman and Kagey Parrish, make their home in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains in Charlottesville, Virginia.

The couple has been playing music in some capacity for over 15 years, but honed in on their natural duet abilities 7 years ago when they met for the first time in college. It was their love of folk music that brought them together and has since taken them out on the road to tour fulltime as the award-winning duet they are today.

Writing and singing in the veins of folk and old country music, the Dewdrops entwine harmony singing with tight instrumentation and craft songs that are simple and fine-tuned. Theirs are new songs from the southern mountains that ring with originality.

After their appearance and first place win on a 2008 talent show broadcast of NPR's "A Prairie Home Companion", the Dewdrops began their careers as songwriters and have since released two critically acclaimed albums, "If the Sun Will Shine" (2009) and "These Old Roots" (2010) both of which have charted at the #1 and #2 positions on the Folk DJ-L Charts for 2010.

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Brian Peters

Brian Peters

wheelchair-accessible
Saturday, October 22, 2011, 8pm
First Parish of Watertown
35 Church Street, Watertown
$15.00 general admission, $10.00 FSSGB members and students
All children 17 and under free
(See map and calculate directions on MapQuest)
For public transportation, check the MBTA web site.
This venue is handicap accessible

Purchase tickets online at BrownPaperTickets.com. Use the code season52 to get member prices.

Brian Peters is a performer of traditional folk music who combines a high level of skill on three different instruments with a great voice and an energetic stage presence. He's a leading English squeezebox player, doubling on melodeon (button accordion) and anglo concertina, a fine guitarist well-versed in open tunings, and a passionate singer who can convey drama or emotion, while his carefully-constructed accompaniments blend adventure and sophistication. Described as "One of British folk music's finest ambassadors", Brian started out in the folk clubs of England and has taken his performances to stages all over the world, touring regularly in Europe and America, and always retaining a deep commitment to the musical traditions of his native country.

Brian believes strongly in the power and relevance of the old songs and bases his sets around them. In particular he specialises in the ancient story songs known as "Child Ballads", and has produced a CD and a special live presentation based around them. "Brian Peters plunges deep into the ancient songs, finds their power, mystery, evil, drollery and courage, and brings them to us fresh", declared one American writer. He's no diehard, though, spicing his regular show with contemporary songs, material of his own and occasional bursts of wild eclecticism; his stage set achieves startling variety, without ever betraying his traditional roots.

On the instrumental side, Brian has been a mover in the creation of a distinct identity for Northern English dance music, researching, playing and teaching rare tunes from centuries-old manuscripts, as well as composing many tunes in traditional style. He's also become known for daring forays into ragtime, blues and rock'n'roll on his squeezeboxes. Brian presents his material with warmth and unforced humour to appeal to the casual listener as well as the committed folk fan.

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Elijah Wald

"Black Hillbillies and White Bluesmen" presented by Elijah Wald

Saturday, November 12, 2011, 8pm
at a private home in Cambridge, MA
$15 for all at the door
Reservations required; email suzanne AT smrozak DOT com for
reservations and directions.

Elijah Wald has been a musician since age seven and a writer since the early 1980s. He spent over ten years as "world music" writer for the Boston Globe and in the current millennium has been devoting most of his time to book projects, including volumes on such disparate subjects as Delta blues, Mexican drug ballads, hitchhiking, as well as the memoire of his friend and mentor Dave Van Ronk.

In this special talk/presentation/concert, Elijah will explore the intertwining roots of American music.

Most of the familiar music of the Southern United States - country, blues, hillbilly, ragtime, folk - grew out of overlaps and interchanges between African and European traditions. Although both folklorists and commercial record companies tended to divide this music by race, the reality was always more complicated: a huge proportion of the "old time" fiddle repertoire is African, and some of the most influential blues stylists were Euro-American (Jimmie Rodgers and Hank Williams leap to mind).

This is a complicated story, including the racist stereotypes of blackface minstrelsy and the transracial blending of southern string bands, not to mention the blend of African banjo and Spanish guitar - and it produced one of the richest musical legacies on the planet. We hope you will join us as Elijah explores this fascinating topic, playing period recordings and performing live examples.

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Norman Kennedy

Norman Kennedy

An Evening of Scottish Stories and Tales

Thursday, November 17, 2011, 8pm
Cambridge, MA
$15 at the door
$5 for students (only if reserved in advance)
Reservations required; email suzanne AT smrozak DOT com for
reservations and directions.

wheelchair-accessible

Concert

Saturday, November 19, 2011, 8pm
St. John's United Methodist Church
80 Mt. Auburn Street, Watertown
$15.00 general admission, $10.00 FSSGB members and students
All children 17 and under free
(See map and calculate directions on MapQuest)
For public transportation, check the MBTA web site.
This venue is handicap accessible

Purchase tickets online at BrownPaperTickets.com. Use the code season52 to get member and student prices.

Norman Kennedy is one of Scotland's finest traditional singers with a unique repertoire of folk songs and ballads. Born and brought up in Aberdeen, he was a neighbor of the great ballad singer Jeanie Robertson and during the evolving folk scene of the 1960's he picked up many songs from her and from other singers such as the bothy ballad singer Jimmy McBeath and the traveller and street singer Davie Stewart.

Norman is a "keeper of the old ways", a master practitioner and teacher of textile arts as well as an unaccompanied singer of traditional Scottish Songs that he learned while growing up. In 1966 he moved to the USA after representing Scotland at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival where he was an immediate success with the "folkies" and the academic alike. The former loved his relaxed, easy style, while the latter recognized a deep knowledge and understanding of the songs, which went way beyond book learning. Here was a young man truly immersed in his tradition and culture. And all these years later he has lost none of that magnetism.

But there's more to Norman than just singing and storytelling. He is an accomplished weaver, who cards, spins, and dyes his own wool in the "old ways". It is a mark of his quest for perfection that he is as well-known in this field as for his singing. But he does not see them as separate entities - the songs help him to concentrate on his weaving and the weaving gives rhythm to his songs. When Norman sings as he weaves it seems the art and the craft were meant to be together.

In June 2003, Norman was awarded the highest honor in folk and traditional arts in the United States. This Master Artist was the recipient of one of eleven fellowships awarded by the National Endowment for the Arts. The award was presented in The Library of Congress by United States President George W Bush.

There has always been an intimacy in Norman's performance, no matter how grand the setting or how large the audience. His songs and stories flow naturally as part of an extended conversation in which the attitudes of a contemporary creative artist are sublimated by a knowledge and continuing fascination with the lives and concerns of past generations.

Hearing Norman Kennedy sing today is unlike witnessing the performance of a singer who came to prominence as part of the Sixties folk revival. Unlike his contemporaries, he recast his whole lifestyle in a traditional mode around his work as a weaver, making the connection between life, work and song a seamless intermeshing where context is an established given. His way of life has brought him closer to the singers from which he learned as a young man and has helped form his understanding of them and the material they passed on. His own performance is thus enriched with strands of meaning that interpret the songs with verbal portraits of the old singers who sang them, giving them their due credit.

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Nowell Sing We Clear

Nowell Sing We Clear

wheelchair-accessible
Saturday, December 3, 2011, 7:30pm (Note earlier time!)
St. John's United Methodist Church
80 Mt. Auburn Street, Watertown, MA
$18 members and students in advance
$20 non-members in advance
$22 for all adults at the door
Children 17 and under free
(See map and calculate directions on MapQuest)

For public transportation, check the MBTA web site.
This venue is handicap accessible

You can purchase tickets online at BrownPaperTickets.com. FSSGB Members can use the code season52 to get member prices. You can purchase tickets via mail order by sending a self-addressed stamped envelope and check (payable to FSSGB Inc) to FSSGB Tickets, c/o Lori Fassman, 17 Faulkner Hill Road, Acton, MA 01720. Soon tickets will be available at Sandy's Music in Cambridge (please call before you go to make sure they have them.)

The Folk Song Society of Greater Boston is proud to again present John Roberts and Tony Barrand in Nowell Sing We Clear, a pageant of mid-winter traditional songs and celebrations. John and Tony, accompanied by Fred Breunig and Andy Davis, perform ancient mid-winter and Christmas folk carols and dances of Western Europe. In a colorful and often humorous fashion, Nowell Sing We Clear shows that current Christmas holiday traditions and music have developed from ancient customs. The program includes a Mummer's play, clog dancing, narration, and a variety of other folk music and dance. There are lots of opportunities for audience participation, and its lively and varied nature make the concert especially well-suited for families. Nowell Sing We Clear is a holiday event not to be missed.

John Roberts and Tony Barrand are well-known and highly respected interpreters of traditional music. Along with Fred Breunig and Andy Davis, they accompany themselves skillfully and tastefully on a variety of instruments: Anglo and English concertinas, drums, whistle, bodhron and fiddle.

Winter clothing drive: FSSGB will be participating in the annual "Share the Warmth" clothing drive sponsored by Golden Key and WUMB. We are asking audience members to donate clean winter clothing in good condition (no rips or tears). Collection will take place at this concert only. All donations of winter clothing are appreciated, for men, women and children - especially coats and sweaters.

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Pub Carol Sing

Start your holiday season with Boston's newest Christmas tradition - the sixth annual Pub Carol Sing!

Sunday, December 4th, 2011, 1-4 pm

in the back room at Doyle's Cafe
3484 Washington St.
Jamaica Plain, MA

Sponsored by the Folk Song Society of Greater Boston
and The West Gallery Quire.

Come and sing Carols from the Sheffield, West Gallery, and Sacred Harp traditions (as well as some standard favorites), led by Bruce Randall of The West Gallery Quire.

With special guests, The Paper Bag Mummers, providing merriment and mayhem!

Suitable for all voices and melodic instruments. Music will be available.

Free! (but we will pass the hat for the waitress)

Contact Bruce Randall (melismata@hotmail.com) for more information.

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Ed Miller

Ed Miller House concert

Saturday, January 14, 2011, 8pm
Newton Corner, MA
$15 at the door
$5 for students (only if reserved in advance)
Reservations required; email suzanne AT smrozak DOT com for
reservations and directions.

Ed Miller is almost certainly the finest Scottish traditional singer from Austin, Texas, but he is more than that. He is from Edinburgh originally and participated in the Scottish folk revival. In 1968 he moved to Austin for "a year or so" where he has been ever since, a member of a diverse university community. He has, as one would expect, a fine voice for the old songs. In addition he has a repertoire of modern songs of urban life, political conflicts, and emigration. For example, he sings of the way of life of the Scottish traveling people and the discrimination they experience. Another song tells of generations who earn a living by farming, then fishing, and then working on the North Sea oil rigs. His first recording features appearances by Latin-American musicians (and soccer players) who are neighbors in Austin and who use traditional instruments of their communities.

Come see Ed for an evening of wonderful music and for stories of diverse experiences.

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Jeff Warner

Jeff Warner

wheelchair-accessible
Saturday, January 28, 2012, 8pm
First Parish of Watertown
35 Church Street, Watertown
$18.00 general admission, $12.00 FSSGB members and students
All children 17 and under free
(See map and calculate directions on MapQuest)
For public transportation, check the MBTA web site.
This venue is handicap accessible

Purchase tickets online at BrownPaperTickets.com. Use the code season52 to get member and student prices. Tickets can also be purchased at the door.

Jeff Warner is among the nation's foremost performer/interpreters of traditional music. His songs from the lumber camps, fishing villages and mountaintops of America connect 21st-century audiences with the everyday lives - and artistry - of 19th-century Americans. "Providing more than just rich entertainment, Jeff will leave you with a deeper appreciation of the land you live in' (Caffe Lena, Saratoga, NY). His songs, rich in local history and a sense of place, bring us the latest news from the distant past.

Jeff grew up listening to the songs and stories of his father Frank Warner and the traditional singers his parents met during their folksong collecting trips through rural America. He accompanied his parents on their later field trips and is the editor of his mother's book, Traditional American Folk Songs: From the Anne and Frank Warner Collection. He is producer of the two-CD set, Her Bright Smile Haunts Me Still, the Warners' recordings of rural singers, many of them born in Victorian times. "The scion of one of the nation's most eminent families of folksong collectors, he represents a tradition that is fundamentally unbroken since pre-industrial times" (Stuart Frank, Senior Curator, New Bedford Whaling Museum).

Jeff has performed widely, from large festivals in the UK, to clubs, festivals and schools across America. He plays concertina, banjo, guitar and several "pocket" instruments, including bones and spoons. And "he inhabits a song in a way which few singers can do" (Royal Oak Folk Club, Lewes, UK).

A native of New York City, Jeff has lived in Portsmouth, NH, since the late 1990s. He is an artist for the New Hampshire Council on the Arts, a speaker for the New Hampshire Humanities Council and was a 2007 State Arts Council Fellow. He has toured nationally for the Smithsonian Institution, taught at Pinewoods, Ashokan and Swannanoa summer music programs and recorded for Flying Fish/Rounder, National Geographic and other labels. His 1995 recording, Two Little Boys received a Parents' Choice Award.

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Members' Concert

Annual FSSGB Members' Concert

wheelchair-accessible
Saturday, February 4, 2012, 7:30pm
First Parish of Watertown
35 Church Street, Watertown
$12.00 general admission, $10.00 FSSGB members and students
All children 17 and under free
(See map and calculate directions on MapQuest)
For public transportation, check the MBTA web site.
This venue is handicap accessible

Purchase tickets online at BrownPaperTickets.com. Use the code season52 to get member and student prices. Tickets can also be purchased at the door.

The annual FSSGB members' concert is always a popular event. Our members perform songs which range from traditional ballads to original compositions, and from instrumental to a cappella pieces. Some of the instruments that have been played at this concert in the past include violin, cello, banjo, mandolin, guitar, bass, keyboard and concertina. Some FSSGB members who have performed at this event have gone on to have successful performing careers, such as Elijah Wald, Mark Ryer, Fool's Errand and Merle Roesler.

Our hosts this year will be Ellen Schmidt and Jake Kensinger, otherwise known as Two for the Show. Ellen and Jake are talented performers who play out regularly, often accompanied by fellow FSSGB members.

Members are invited to sign up to perform - one song or a spoken word piece. You may perform alone or with others. Some performers have been participating for years; others will do so for the first time. Children are most welcome. The program will feature professional musicians as well as living room folk enthusiasts. All are welcome. The Midweek Singers are an important part of the program as are the many members who show up especially for this event. The audience is always supportive and lively.

FSSGB members (including new members!) are welcome to sign up to perform one song or spoken word piece. Contact Ellen Schmidt at eschmidt01742 AT gmail DOT com to sign up by January 25th.

Proceeds from this show help keep the Society strong - we thank the performers and the audience for making this event possible.

Click here to hear some recordings done by our talented members!

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David and Linnea Coffin

Benefit Concert with David and Linnea Coffin

wheelchair-accessible
Saturday, March 10, 2012, 8pm
First Parish of Watertown
35 Church Street, Watertown
Admission: $20
All children 17 and under free
(See map and calculate directions on MapQuest)
For public transportation, check the MBTA web site.
This venue is handicap accessible

Purchase tickets online at BrownPaperTickets.com or at the door. Proceeds from this concert will benefit the First Parish's Helen Robinson Wright Fund, which offers assistance to individuals in need in Watertown.

David Coffin will be joined by his daughter, Linnea (age 15), who provides angelic harmonies to David's performances. They will also be joined by Kent Allyn on piano and guitar. Kent features on all David's CD's and is the consummate sideman. He is a much sought after studio musician and has played with Ben Baldwin and the Big Note for over 30 years. David informs us that he's also a really cool guy.

David has performed throughout New England since 1980. His venues range from concert halls and coffeehouses to schools, radio, and museums. He is equally adept firing up a crowd to sing, or at playing music in the background to create atmosphere (often during the same occasion!) Widely known for his rich baritone voice, his impressive collection of musical instruments includes concertinas, recorders, penny-whistles, bombards (loud Breton double reeds), gemshorns, cornamuse, shawm, rauschphieffe - or, as he explains, "generally anything that requires a lot of hot air." Many of these instruments are used in his interactive school enrichment program "Music from the King's Court: Exploring the Early Winds."

At the heart of David's work is traditional and contemporary folk music. He draws on vocal and instrumental music from North America as well as England, Scotland, Ireland and Brittany. David also has an extensive collection of songs from the Maritime tradition. Sea-chanteys, ballads and the songs of the sailors comprise his main repertoire, though he still will rise to an occasion to perform his favorite Baroque recorder sonatas.

David has performed with the Cambridge-based Revels since 1980 as a singer, instrumentalist and, since 1991, as Master of Ceremonies. As of 2009, with the Christmas and Spring performances combined, he has appeared in over 50 different Revels productions, celebrating the solstices through the traditions of many cultures.

To date, David has recorded four solo CDs and has participated on numerous other recording projects both vocally and as an instrumentalist. His latest CD, Last Trip Home, was released in the Fall of 2009.

Linnea has become a performer in her own right. As a dancer she featured prominently in this past year's Christmas Revels as the skeleton. She has danced Carnegie Hall and yet she continues to be willing to sing with her Dad.

During this concert you can count hearing on many songs from the maritime tradition as well as a variety of "current favorites".

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Peggy Seeger

Musical Conversation with Peggy Seeger

Thursday, April 19 , 2012, 8pm
Brookline, MA
$15 at the door
$5 for students (only if reserved in advance)
Reservations required; email suzanne AT smrozak DOT com for
reservations and directions.

Imagine our delight at finding out that Peggy will be in town and is willing to do a special presentation for us!

Peggy is Pete Seeger's half-sister, Ruth Crawford Seeger's daughter; partner to Ewan MacColl, who wrote First Time Ever I Saw Your Face for her. They led the folk revival in England for 30 years and recorded many, many albums. Her best-known compositions are Gonna Be an Engineer and The Ballad of Springhill (the latter has come to be regarded as a traditional song).

She would like this event to be a singing reflection on her life and career, playing her favorites, answering questions, talking and singing, that lasts as long as anyone wants it to. Please join us for this rare opportunity to see Peggy in an intimate setting while she's back in the US!

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FSSGB Song Swap at the New England Folk Festival

Friday, April 20, 2012, 10-11pm
Mansfield Middle School, Room 103/104
Mansfield, MA

Visit the NEFFA website for information about admission fees, hours, and location, plus lots of other information about this wonderful festival!

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Sally Rogers and Howie Bursen

Sally Rogers and Howie Bursen

wheelchair-accessible
Saturday, April 28, 2012, 8pm
First Parish of Watertown
35 Church Street, Watertown
$18.00 general admission, $12.00 FSSGB members and students
All children 17 and under free
(See map and calculate directions on MapQuest)
For public transportation, check the MBTA web site.
This venue is handicap accessible

This concert is co-sponsored by the Brookline Music School, the Muddy River Dulcimer Festival and FSSGB.

Purchase tickets online at BrownPaperTickets.com. Use the code season52 to get member and student prices. Tickets can also be purchased at the door.

This exciting duo, whose harmonies will send shivers up your spine, has racked up a string of successes in songwriting, studio recording, and crowd-pleasing displays of instrumental and vocal virtuosity. They have appeared on Garrison Keillor's "A Prairie Home Companion" public radio show, and have toured from coast to coast. Their first album together, Satisfied Customers, on the Flying Fish label, gives testimony to their wide-ranging abilities.

Sally Rogers has achieved national recognition as a solo performer. Sally's second album was voted "Best Folk Album of the Year" by the National Association of Independent Record Distributors. Pete Seeger said, "Sally has a beautiful voice and has written many extraordinarily good songs that are going to reach out and touch large numbers of people. They sure are great songs!" Rogers has served as Connecticut's official State Troubadour, and also as a Master Teaching Artist for the Connecticut Commission on the Arts.

Howie Bursen is known for his warm baritone voice, devilish sense of humor, inventive guitar arrangements, and red-hot banjo wizardry. Chicago Magazine said, "stunning guitar arrangements...easily one of the finest banjo players ever heard." His song, "Small Business Blues", was recently recorded by Ronnie Gilbert, Pete Seeger, Arlo Guthrie and Holly Near on their album, Harp. Pete also included it in his book, Carry it On, published by Simon and Schuster.

Rogers and Bursen met, appropriately enough at a Greenwich Village coffeehouse in 1981, and ever since have been building a national reputation at festivals and concert halls throughout the U.S.A. and Canada. They were married in 1982 and now make their home on the shores of a one-time cranberry bog in Eastern Connecticut.

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Martha Burns House concert

Saturday, May 5, 2012, 8pm
At Cambridge Cohousing, hosted by Dan and Molly Watt
$15 at the door
$5 for students (only if reserved in advance)
Reservations required; email suzanne AT smrozak DOT com for
reservations and directions.

With an old-time voice that echoes the mountains, Martha Burns sings southern ballads, cowboy songs, comic ditties, turn-of-the-century heart-throbbers, and whatever else strikes her fancy. A gifted solo performer, she has also appeared in old-time duets and with several top-notch string bands. Martha's sensitivity to the traditions from which she sings lends a special richness to all her performances. Her easy manner and warm humor have delighted audiences throughout the United States, as well as Canada and the UK.

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Barrand, Murphy and Tracy

"Songs from the Hills of Vermont"

Performed by Tony Barrand, Keith Murphy and Becky Tracy
wheelchair-accessible
Saturday, May 19, 2012, 8pm
First Parish of Watertown
35 Church Street, Watertown
$18.00 general admission, $12.00 FSSGB members and students
All children 17 and under free
(See map and calculate directions on MapQuest)
For public transportation, check the MBTA web site.
This venue is handicap accessible

Purchase tickets online at BrownPaperTickets.com. Use the code season52 to get member and student prices. Tickets can also be purchased at the door.

Tony Barrand, Keith Murphy and Becky Tracy perform selections from "Songs from the Hills of Vermont", from the Atwood family in Dover, Vermont, around the turn of the last century. "Songs from the Hills of Vermont," published in 1919, is a set of 13 folks songs collected by Edith Barnes Sturgis from the singing of James Atwood, his second wife, Mary, and an "intimate friend," Aunt Jenny Knapp. The evening will include the story of how the songs were nearly lost to history but for the efforts of Sturgis, Margaret MacArthur and the Vermont Folklife Center.

Keith Murphy is a professional singer and musician on guitar and mandolin. He teaches several classes for a range of ages and abilities on the dance music of northern New England and is the organizer of the annual Northern Roots Festival. Keith has toured throughout the United States and abroad with his wife, fiddler Becky Tracy and as part of their former trio, Nightingale. He has also frequently appeared in Brattleboro as part of the fiddle extravaganza, Childsplay. Dr. Tony Barrand is recognized as a major interpreter of English ballads and song. He is a retired academic folklorist whose most recent research has been a study of the singers and collectors of the Atwood family repertoire. Keith and Tony recently recorded a CD of their own arrangements of these songs called "On the Banks of Coldbrook".

"The songs are evocative, distinctive, beautifully written and totally enjoyable to sing, play, and hear," says musician Susan Dedell, who has performed this program with Tony and Keith. "The program will be pure and engaging entertainment, in the best sense of that word."

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Woody Guthrie Centennial Celebration (house concert)

Friday, July 13, 2012, 8pm
Newton Corner, MA
$15 at the door
$5 for students (only if reserved in advance)
Reservations required; email suzanne AT smrozak DOT com for
reservations and directions.

We've found a wonderful way to kick off our celebration of Woody Guthrie's 100th birthday! Accomplished musicians David Bernz, Jacob Bernz, Fred Gillen, Jr., Steve Kirkman and Amy Fradon will be putting on a celebration of the 100th anniversary of Woody Guthrie's birth. "Hope Machine" (Fred Gillen Jr & Steve Kirkman) was born at a Woody Guthrie Hootenanny and named at Clearwater's Great Hudson River Revival in 2004, after a quote from Woody Guthrie: "About all a human being is anyway is a hoping machine." Since then they've been traveling all over the country writing and singing songs of hope, peace, and justice. They are an "official program" of the Woody Guthrie Foundation and Archives. Their shows are spontaneous celebrations and they encourage participation, on stage and off. Amy Fradon is an accomplished musician in her own right with an amazing voice and a great stage presence. She has numerous CDs to her credit and has also been a key member of the Vanaver Caravan 's "Pastures of Plenty" show which celebrates Woody's music in song and dance. David Bernz is a former member of the Stone Soup quartet and is currently touring with "Work o' the Weavers," a tribute in music and narrative to Pete Seeger's quintessential folk quartet.

We were lucky enough to be able to line these folks up for a house concert while they were passing through Boston. Please join us for this event, which is the first of several Woody Guthrie tributes that FSSGB will be participating in during this special 100th anniversary year.

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"Bound for Glory"

Sunday, August 26, 2012, 2pm
Old Manse, Concord, MA

More info to come. Contact Ellen Schmidt, eschmidt01742 AT gmail DOT com, for details.

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